Halina's Thoughts
August 2017
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Non -Native and Native English Teachers

Native English Teacher or non- Native English Teachers

tylkoja

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Is English a Global Language?

 

The contentious issue of (non)nativeness remains unanswered.
Nowadays, being an NNEST or NNEST should not count but rather teachers’ professional capabilities.
The presentation provides a forum for reflection and discussion about NNESTs.
We should value professional and personal qualities over ‘nativeness.’
The skills and qualities that make an effective language teacher are the most significant.
Both ‘NESTs’ and ‘NNESTs’ are expected to be competent teachers, each with excellent professional skills.
What can non-native English-speaking teachers (NNESTs) perform better?
What can native English-speaking teachers (NESTs) manage better?

 

Business Small Talk: How to Have Good Conversations (Even When You Don’t Feel Confident Speaking English) | English with a Twist

For my students.

Continuing with the theme of guest posts, I am delighted to introduce you to yet another guest writer here on EWAT. This time I have the pleasure of welcoming Jacob Gershkovich, a fellow English teacher. In his interesting and super useful post, Jacob brilliantly illustrates how you can make a good impression and enjoy a good conversation with business colleagues even if you feel your English could be better. This is ideal for anyone who wants to feel more confident in the business small talk. Enjoy the post. *************************** Listen to the post Read the post Let’s imagine that you’re at a networking event. You see someone standing across the room who you’d really like to connect with, someone who could be really helpful to know. You want to introduce yourself to this person and begin a conversation, but you don’t feel confident as an English speaker. You’re worried that you won’t be able to express yourself properly in English, or even worse, that you’ll say something silly

Source: Business Small Talk: How to Have Good Conversations (Even When You Don’t Feel Confident Speaking English) | English with a Twist

Intonation in English language teaching

Opening Plenary by Jane Setter
Introduction
Intonation is one of the earliest acquired aspects of speech; the crymelodies of infants are influenced by the intonation of their mothers, and very small toddlers are able to use intonation to indicate turn taking patterns in play conversations before they can form words. It plays a vital role in successful communication in English, as it does in other languages. If this is true, why is intonation neglected in English language pronunciation teaching, and how can it be taught effectively?
This presentation takes the audience into the seldom-navigated region of intonation in English language teaching, focusing on the role of three main elements: tonality, tonicity and tone. Drawing on material from a number of different sources, we explore the role of intonation in English, and look at which elements are teachable, which are learnable, what resources are available to the teacher and the learner, and how intonation might be approached in the English language classroom and as a self-access learning activity. Expect a multimedia, audience participation experience.
Pronunciation

from English Grammar Today
Pronunciation means how we say words. Most people speak the dialect of standard English with an accent that belongs to the part of the country they come from or live in. Learners of British English commonly hear RP (received pronunciation), which is an accent often used on the BBC and other news media and in some course materials for language learners, but it is also common to hear a variety of regional accents of English from across the world.

How we use spoken stress and rhythm is also an important part of pronunciation. For example, it is important to know which syllables in a word are stressed and how different patterns of stressed and unstressed syllables are pronounced. There are also common patterns of intonation in English which enable us to give special emphasis to particular words, phrases and sentences.
See also: Dialect, British and American English, SpellingIntonation

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Here are some snapshots from the presentstion.

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IATEFL Online Conference in Glasgow, 2017

Tune in for live coverage from Glasgow on Monday 3rd April

 

 

Following my previous year experience, I am willing to write a few blog posts about the video content (streamed or recorded interviews or video sessions) published on the IATEFL Online site during the 2017 IATEFL Conference.
Watch the 2017 IATEFL Conference live online
51st Annual International IATEFL Conference and Exhibition
SEC, Glasgow, UK
4th-7th April 2017
Pre-Conference Events and Associates’ Day, 3rd April 2017

 

Welcome to Halina’s Conversational English online course

Video Welcome to Halina’s Conversational English online course By Halina Ostańkowicz- Bazan I have been teaching languages for over 40 years.I taught Polish as foreign languages in traditional sett…

Source: Welcome to Halina’s Conversational English online course

MoodleMOOT 2017

Source: MoodleMOOT 2017

MoodleMOOT 2017

Dear Diana,
It is a pleasure to read your excellent posts.
Thank you for writing them.

Diana's Notepad

So the MoodleMOOT 2017 is over. This was a three-day event with 24 webinars with speakers from 13 countries of the world. As usual, MoodleMOOT was organized by Dr. Nellie Deutch, who is inspirational, as always. I am so glad that this year I could make it!

This time Nellie asked us to post our reflections to the Moodle site. And I am reflecting on some webinars and want to put those reflections here as well.

So this is my first reflection on the Opening Ceremony.

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Non -Native and Native English Teachers

Source: Non -Native and Native English Teachers

What Makes a Great (Native or Non-Native Speaking) English Teacher?

Source: What Makes a Great (Native or Non-Native Speaking) English Teacher?

Péter Medgyes’ ‘The Non-native Teacher’ – why publish a new edition?

I have just bought the book.
It is an excellent source of information.
Thank you for writing it.

TEFL Equity Advocates

More than 20 years ago, in the early 1990s, there was a lot of discussion about the position of teachers of English who were either native or non-native speakers of the language. In The Non-native Teacher Péter Medgyes, a Hungarian, wrote about the relative advantages and disadvantages, problems and insights, of both groups. This became a successful book, used widely on teacher training courses in many countries.

However, as with so many other aspects of teaching and methodology, interest in the topic went up and down over the years. Coinciding with changes in publishing companies, both the first (Macmillan) 1994 edition and the later (Hueber) 1999 one, went out of print.

In the last few years, as the importance of both pre- and in-service training has begun to be increasingly recognised, together with the relevance of its various forms to different kinds of learning/teaching environment (primary, secondary, adults), the debate…

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IATEFL 2016 I’m a non-native English speaker teacher – hear me roar! (Dita Phillips)

Source: IATEFL 2016 I’m a non-native English speaker teacher – hear me roar! (Dita Phillips)

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