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Language Learning Theories

https://www.youtube.com/embed/BHp-8tYgQIs“>Language Learning Theories

Learning Theories

  • What learning theories do you follow and why?
  • How do you incorporate them into your teaching? Try to be as specific as you can.

How People Learn

Today, the primary theory is socio-constructivist—in which knowledge is understood to be importantly shaped by the context in which it is situated, and is actively constructed through social negotiation with others. On this understanding, learning environments should be where:

  • Constructive, self-regulated learning is fostered
  • The learning is sensitive to the context
  • It will often be collaborative

Theoretical concepts do not yield concrete prescriptions for classroom application, but the good theory can be used flexibly and creatively by teachers in their planning and educational practice. At the same time, not all learning takes place in the classroom as much of it occurs at home, on the sports field, in museums and so forth (non-formal education), and sometimes implicitly and effortlessly (informal learning).

In the mid-1950s, humanistic psychologist Abraham Maslow created a theory of basic, psychological and self-fulfillment needs that motivate individuals to move consciously or subconsciously through levels or tiers based on our inner and outer satisfaction of those met or unmet needs. I find this theory eternally relevant for students and adults, especially in today’s education.

 

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/addressing-our-needs-maslow-hierarchy-lori-desautels

Become an active learner. The brain works on a use-it-or-lose-it style, meaning you must apply whatever you learn.

And then use the new phrase or character in a real situation: with a language partner or writing online.

Learning the words and phrases through original videos makes them stick quickly, making you learn faster.

Make language learning a passion.

Merge the fun of language learning with the commitment to follow through. Knowing that you want to learn a new language is not enough to get us actually to take action. Give yourself clarity on what exactly compels you to learn a new language. Figure out the why behind your desire to learn. What’s the goal behind the goal? What’s the bigger picture here? How will learn a new language open opportunities in your future? Just answering these questions for yourself will motivate you to much higher level to take action when necessary.

 

 

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1 Comment

  1. […] Source: Language Learning Theories […]

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