Halina's Thoughts

Home » English » Small Talks

Category Archives: Small Talks

Advertisements

How to introduce yourself so you’ll be unforgettable (in a good way!) — ideas.ted.com

If you can move beyond the boring basics when you’re asked “What do you do?”, you’ll set yourself up for new relationships, opportunities and revelations, says introduction expert Joanna Bloor. Mingling at a work event inevitably means being asked the question “What do you do?” over and over again. After years of repetition and conditioning,…

via How to introduce yourself so you’ll be unforgettable (in a good way!) — ideas.ted.com

Advertisements

The Essentials Of Halina’s Teaching

_Professional_VC
Halina in VC
I am a passionate non- native English teacher from Poland. Teaching is a crucial part of my life. With that understanding, I am a lifelong learner.

I am applying a blended learning/ training and flipped classroom approaches.
The traditional physical classroom settings are not efficient enough, for my lessons.

In my opinion, technology gives us countless new possibilities.
As I have already specified, I prefer blended learning, which means, taking advantage of both, traditional f2f techniques and opportunities confronted with new technologies.

An occasion to meet and connect with people from the entire Globe is one of the reasons I appreciate online communication, very much.

I retired in October 2013 and signed for a freelance Senior Lecturer occupation at the Wroclaw University of Technology.

At present, I am going to continue taking and giving online English courses.

Thinking in a foreign language is precisely what I want my students to accomplish. I teach without a bridge language, or lingua franca was also known as a common language, trade language or even vehicular language. Students do not share any language. I focus on practical communication skills which cover the ability to: speak appropriately with a wide variety of students while maintaining good eye contact, demonstrate a varied vocabulary and tailor the language to your audience. We need to listen effectively, present ideas appropriately, write clearly and in brief and work well in a group. All of these abilities and competencies required excellent communication skills.

When I teach Polish, my foreigners and I have to speak only Polish, and my English classes are run entirely in English.
This means they are required to forget about their native language and start speaking as well as thinking in a foreign language.
My students learn English in different contexts, mostly singing phrases, expressions, collocation, idioms, and phrasal verbs, and also telling stories. Moreover, I encourage them to talk to everybody, even to themselves in a foreign language. As a result of this, they can establish a set of compelling stories. I correct only substantial mistakes. I do not want them to stop talking. I also encourage my students to listen to songs, watch movies with subtitles in a language they learn, read a lot and so forth.
Additionally, to improve a student’s pronunciation, I often use YouTube videos as well as movies with English subtitles and obviously songs.

I believe in using music in English teaching. My approach is that we do not speak the language, but instead we sing it. English bears a unique melody, rhythm as well as intonation.
My students enjoy English lessons with me because they are never bored.

Halina_June_2018_Moment

 

True Learning

BannerforNing6

DSC_0069.jpg

Authentic Learning

 

I give English one to one tutoring classes as well as ONLINE English Courses.

I realize what YOU need to succeed in English. I know the essential skills you need to grow to suit an active communicator in English.

My classes are for students who want to use a most proficient approach to get fluent in English fast by practicing English Skills. Training is a subconscious process and is faster than conscious learning.

Being capable of putting across effectively is the most important of all life skills.

Communication is merely the act of transferring information from one place to another, whether this is vocal,  written, visually or non-verbally (using body language, gestures and the tone and pitch of the voice).

How well this information can be transmitted and received is a measure of how good our communication skills are.

Training your English communication skills can facilitate all aspects of your life, from your professional spirit to social gatherings and everything in between.

 

Conventional methods of learning English exemplify passive learning with a limited success rate. I firmly trust in Active Learning of English Skills which is much more efficient than passive learning.

These are the primary disadvantages of passive English learning

  1. The major weakness of passive education is that it splits the language into different components – reading, writing, listening, grammar, and pronunciation – which you try to learn separately.
  2. When learners are not actively involved in the class, they continue to think in their native language. Whatever the instructor explains to them, they try to interpret it in their mother tongue. It becomes nearly impossible to process the information intuitively or spontaneously.
  3. Because learners aren’t taught to think in English, they are unable to communicate in English.

Active learning helps students start speaking English confidently in less than a year.
Active learning is more than just listening: it involves the active participation of students. They must use the language all the time and be emotionally involved in the process.

We call for the conversion from Passive Learning to Active Training English Skills

As a language teacher, I use all kinds of tricks just because making students speak and building their self-confidence in keeping the conversation going is the most essential for me.
When I teach Polish, my foreigners and I have to speak only Polish, and also my English classes are run entirely in English. I train without a bridge language.
This signifies they are required to forget about native language and start speaking as well as intending in a foreign linguistic communication. Thinking in a foreign language, this is just what I want my learners to achieve.
My students learn the words in different contexts, mostly singing phrases, expressions, collocations, idiomatic expressions, phrasal verbs also telling tales. Moreover, I inspire them to talk to everybody, even to themselves in a foreign language. Consequently, they can communicate as well as discuss a variety of beautiful narrations.
Many teachers spend most of their time altering each other’s errors.

Nevertheless, I correct only fundamental errors, as I don’t want students to stop talking. I also encourage my learners to listen to songs, watch movies with subtitles in a language they learn, read a lot and so forth.

Moodle_Experience_2_Jun_2013_de7d827bHalina's Course

 

  1. The most important is to deliver comprehensible input. We improve the language when we understand it.

I am very much against the support in the native language.

  1. Learners spend more time dynamically speaking English when we convince them, for working students.
    I also develop an environment for gaining all language skills – reading, listening, speaking, writing, and pronunciation at the same time. Learners experience everyday situations again entirely in English.
  2. The mobile is an obvious choice for delivering information. It affords pupils access to reading material both in the course of educational activity and after the class of a written report. It covers support for sharing sessions with friends or teachers, which is essential for digital learners.using-digital-tools-

The lessons added by a teacher allow building an active connection between everyone.

As a result, I as an English teacher achieve a perpetual change from passive learning to the active, improving English skills.

4

 

Thank you for reading and watching.

Wishing you all the best,

Halina Ostankowicz- Bazan

References

http://edglossary.org/authentic-learning/

https://uteach.utexas.edu/sites/default/files/files/SixKeyStrategiesELL.pdf

https://www.ernweb.com/educational-research-articles/the-four-characteristics-of-authentic-learning/

https://youtu.be/XOupbmSx27A

https://clt.curtin.edu.au/teaching_learning_practice/student_centred/authentic.cfm

 

 

  1. Brookfield, S. (2000). Adult cognition as a dimension of lifelong learning. In J. Field &
  2. Cisero, C. A. (2006). Does reflective journal writing improve course performance? College Teaching, 54, 231-236.
  3. Developing Language Objectives for English Language Learners in Physical Education Lessons. Clancy, M. & Hruska, B. (2005).
  4. Dewey, J. (1933). How we think (Revised). Boston: D.C. Heath.
  5. Duckett, H. (2002). Smoke and mirrors? Evaluating the use of reflective practice as a management learning technique.” Education-line database, December 23.
  6. Effective Instruction for English-Language Learners. Protheroe, N. (2011).
  7. English Language Learners: A Policy Research Brief produced by the National Council of Teachers of English. NCTE. (2008).
  8. Instructional Models and Strategies for Teaching English Language Learners. Center on Instruction. Moughamian et al. (2009).
  9. Shulruf, B. (2011). Do extra-curricular activities in school improve educational outcomes? A critical review and meta-analysis of the literature. International Review of Education, (56),591-612.

 

English Conversation Seminar on Polish History and Culture

DSC_0141.jpgPolish Culture and History

The Course will concentrate attention on the crucial events in the history of Poland its victories and calamities.  Its economic and cultural development, the most important places of spiritual life (like Wawel Cathedral, Jasna Góra), most significant achievements of science, industry,  literature, music, and arts.  It aims to  bring  an acquaintance with life and works of outstanding polish  artists (Wyspiański, Nowosielski, Fangor), musicians (Chopin, Wieniawski, Lutosławski, Penderecki),  writers (Sienkiewicz, Gombrowicz, Miłosz, Szymborska), movie directories (Wajda, Kieślowski) and scientists (Copernicus, Hevelius, Staszic,  Skłodowska – Curie).People whose achievements deserve a worldwide promotion.

This course requires participants a bit of activity such as reading samples of works of polish Nobel prize winners in literature, confronting polish history and its heritage with the history of their own countries, looking for relations and connections.

Poland in the 21st Century
Poland – basic facts.
How to avoid faux pas – how to use the presented expression correctly?
Polish legends. Piast dynasty.
Polish cuisine, rules connected with meals.
Jagiellonian dynasty.
Renaissance in Poland.
First elected monarchs. House of Vasa. Stefan Batory and Jan III Sobieski.
Polish holidays – part I
Wrocław today and yesterday.
History and culture of Wrocław.
The partitions of Poland. Uprising fights for the independence.
Polish romanticism.
I World War and the restoration of Poland’s sovereignty. The figure of Józef Piłsudski.
The time of Second Polish Republic.
Polish holidays – part II
II World War. German occupation. Holocaust and German Nazi concentration camps on the territory of Poland. Soviet occupation– prison camps on Soviet territories. Katyn massacre.
The post-war period – lack of freedom. Times of Stalinism.
The reign of Communists. Strikes and the birth of ‘Solidarity’ (Polish Trade Union). The figure of Lech Wałęsa. The Martial law in Poland. The fall of Communism, the Round Table, restoration of sovereignty.
John Paul II became a Pope in 1978. The role of his pontificate in the history of Poland, Europe, and the world.
Great Poles.
Most significant masterpieces of Polish arts – summary.
Cultural Diversity – discussion. ­
PRIMARY LITERATURE:

A PAINTED HISTORY OF POLAND, RED. E. OLCZAK, WSTĘP: J. TAZBIR, WYD. DEMART, WARSZAWA 2009.
BUBCZYK R., A HISTORY OF POLAND IN OUTLINE, WYD. 3 UZUPEŁNIONE, LUBLIN 2011.
NOWIŃSKI K., POLSKA. POLAND. OPOWIEŚĆ O LUDZIACH, ZABYTKACH I PRZYRODZIE. PEOPLE, NATURE AND HISTORIC TREASURES, WYD. 3, WARSZAWA 2011.
WÓJCIK T., POLAND. THE MOST BEAUTIFUL SITES, WARSZAWA 2008.
SECONDARY LITERATURE:

DAVIES N., GOD’S PLAYGROUND. A HISTORY OF POLAND, OXFORD 2010.
God’s Playground, A History of Poland: Volume 1: The Origins to 1795 (English) 19. April 2003
God’s Playground: 1795 to the Present-Day v.2: A History of Poland (English) January 1983 Norman Davies (Autor)
Poland: A History (English) – 20. July 2015 Adam Zamoyski
5.    Heart of Europe: The Past in Poland’s Present (English) – 23. August 2001 Norman Davies (Autor)

6.    Microcosm: Portrait of a Central European City. Book by Norman Davies and Roger Moorhouse

Recommended literature and teaching resources Polish Culture and History.

a.    Ford Charles, Hammond R; The Polish Film; McFarland ₰ Company, London 2005.

b.    N. Davies; Heart of Europe. A Short History of Poland, Oxford University Press 1986.

c.     J. Falkowska, S. Janicki; The New Polish Cinema, QuickBooks 2003.

d.    J. Falkowska; Andrzej Wajda. New York – Oxford, NerghamBooks 2008.

e.    Haltof Marek; Polish Film and Holocaust; BrghahnBooks 2011. M.Hennel – Bernasikowa;

f.      The Tapestries of Sigismund August, Zamek królewski na Wawelu, Kraków 1998. Janicki ;

g.    The Polish Film Yesterday and Today. Interpress, Warszawa 1985.

h.    Mangha – The History of the Design, Mangha, Kraków 2009. A. Mickiewicz; Forefathers,

i.      The Polish Cultural Foundation London 1968. J. K. Ostrowski; Cracow, Wyd. Artystyczne i Filmowe, Cracow – Warsaw, 1992.

j.      Polish Literature from the Middle Ages to the end of the Eighteenth Century. A Bilingual Anthology Selected and Translated by Michael J Mikoś, Constans, Warszawa 1999.

k.   M. Romanowska; Stanisław Wyspiański, BOSZ, Kraków 2009.

l.      Selected Poems by W. Szymborska, Cz. Miłosz, T Różewixcz, J. Hartwig , Kraków 1968-2013.

 

Zapraszam na korepetycje z języka angielskiego.

ID_mojeAngielski_Ulotka_New1

Hi to My Online Students

ID_mojeHi to My Online Students,

I am an enthusiastic online non-native English teacher. I have been teaching English online since 2010. I have taught children as well as adults. I have a master’s degree in education from the University of Wroclaw, Poland, Philology, Linguistics Jul 1974. After 40 years of teaching, I grow into an experienced online professional tutor. I specialize in Conversational English. I also prepare, for various tests, including the Cambridge and Oxford standardized exams.

I take advantage of new technologies. My approach is Teaching English with Technology. I use blended learning, flipping the classroom, learning by teaching or encouraging change from passive to fully active learners are significant implements in my teaching/ learning.

If you wish to practice speaking, I’d be happy to help you develop a study plan.  Feel free to look at my teaching profile and class offerings and send me a message if you think I can help you.
I specialize in Conversational English Online courses.
Moreover, I have been successfully preparing for English exams since a long time ago.
Why don’t you check my profile here or just Google me?
Look forward to hearing from you.
Greetings,
Halina Ostańkowicz – Bazan

 

English for Communication

learner styles3

 

Study and practice English listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills with a focus on listening and speaking for basic communication. regarding everyday-life situations, feeling and opinion expressions, role-play performance as well as basic grammatical structures and usage.

Learn how to talk about everyday-life situations, feeling and opinion expressions, role-play performance.Understand basic grammatical structures and the usage.

The course is for Elementary to Intermediate Levels.

English Course

Course Objectives

After completing through this course, students can be able to:

  1. introduce themselves and someone else to others;
  2. ask for and give directions accurately;
  3. describe the features of things, places, and people;
  4. ask for clarifications appropriately;
  5. make and respond to invitations and suggestions appropriately;
  6. express feelings as well as opinions towards the given situations;
  7. apply knowledge to advanced English courses or further study;
  8. use language expressions to deal with everyday situations;
  9. have positive attitudes towards learning English.

Teaching Methods are based on Teaching with Technology Approach

  1. PPT with introduction to the topic/ Lecture
  2. Group /pair/individual tasks
  3. Presentation and discussion
  4. Additional assignments and supplementary worksheets

Evaluation

1.1 Attendance and participation

1.2 Speaking test

1.3 Worksheets and assignments

1.4 Role-play

Final Interview / Spoken  Examination

Most of all, I want my students to experience some immediate success in conversation in English. Small, speedy success helps learners to communicate in their foreign language and also motivates the student to keep studying.

It is necessary because language learning is a long, difficult task that requires persistence.

%d bloggers like this: