Halina's Thoughts

Home » #IATEFL

Category Archives: #IATEFL

Intonation in English language teaching

Opening Plenary by Jane Setter
Introduction
Intonation is one of the earliest acquired aspects of speech; the crymelodies of infants are influenced by the intonation of their mothers, and very small toddlers are able to use intonation to indicate turn taking patterns in play conversations before they can form words. It plays a vital role in successful communication in English, as it does in other languages. If this is true, why is intonation neglected in English language pronunciation teaching, and how can it be taught effectively?
This presentation takes the audience into the seldom-navigated region of intonation in English language teaching, focusing on the role of three main elements: tonality, tonicity and tone. Drawing on material from a number of different sources, we explore the role of intonation in English, and look at which elements are teachable, which are learnable, what resources are available to the teacher and the learner, and how intonation might be approached in the English language classroom and as a self-access learning activity. Expect a multimedia, audience participation experience.
Pronunciation

from English Grammar Today
Pronunciation means how we say words. Most people speak the dialect of standard English with an accent that belongs to the part of the country they come from or live in. Learners of British English commonly hear RP (received pronunciation), which is an accent often used on the BBC and other news media and in some course materials for language learners, but it is also common to hear a variety of regional accents of English from across the world.

How we use spoken stress and rhythm is also an important part of pronunciation. For example, it is important to know which syllables in a word are stressed and how different patterns of stressed and unstressed syllables are pronounced. There are also common patterns of intonation in English which enable us to give special emphasis to particular words, phrases and sentences.
See also: Dialect, British and American English, SpellingIntonation

Snapshot(15)

Here are some snapshots from the presentstion.

Snapshot(17)Snapshot(27)snapshot28.pngSnapshot(26)snapshot32.png

Snapshot(24)

Outside in: bringing new technology perspectives to ELT

Presenter(s):
Geoff stead
Donald Clark
Paul Driver
Yvonne Rogers
Session details:

They talked  a lot about technology in ELT. A panel of technology experts, bringing experiences from outside the ELT world,  discussed trends such as machine translation, artificial intelligence, chatbots and future workplaces. Their perspectives should challenge our current thinking, and help us consider future possibilities.

IATEFL Online Conference in Glasgow, 2017

We were listening to the experts describing their experiences  with teaching English using new technologies.

The listeners asked questions such as;

  • What does exactly technology bring to our English teaching?
  • Can technology substitute  the teachers?
  • Do we have to be the digital teachers?
  • Will technology improve the education in the poor countries?

 Since computers started to be introduced in language learning (and in education in
general) people have rightly asked whether the investment we are making in these
technologies gives us value for money. As digital technologies have taken a hold
in society in general, this particular question is not asked quite so often, but it is
still important to make sure that the technologies that we have available are used
effectively. People are always tempted to try to make an argument for technology
having an impact on the development of pedagogy and in many cases we can see
that the use of technology has enabled teachers to re-think what they are doing.
We also see people trying to populate this domain by talking about notions like the
‘flipped classroom’, ostensibly a methodology that sees input as occurring at ‘home’
and physical classrooms being used as spaces to explore what has been presented
in the input. This is far from being a new idea, but these agendas are pushed for
a while and then disappear again. What is a contender for a methodology that is
central to the world of technology and language learning is that of blended learning
(Motteram and Sharma, 2009). We see this methodology still being developed, but
when handled best it is the most likely candidate for a starting point for getting
teachers to work with technology in their practice. It is still the case that most
teachers work in physical classrooms and looking at ways that these spaces can
be augmented with digital technologies is a very good starting point.

Innovations in learning technologies for English language teaching

 

Plenary session by Gabriel Diaz Maggioli

Empowering teachers through continuous professional development:frameworks, practices and promises
Gabriel Díaz  Maggioli
National Teacher Education College, Uruguay
April 4, 2017
9:00 –10:20

Main Points of Presentation

REALITY CHECK 2002
“…while particular ‘lighthouse’ schools and school systems are the exception, my sense is that professional development as it is experienced by most teachers and principals is pretty much like it has always been—unfocused, insufficient, and irrelevant to the day-to-day problems faced by front line educators. Put another way, a great deal more is known today about good staff development than is regularly practiced in schools.”
Dennis Sparks, 2002

(more…)

IATEFL Online Conference in Glasgow, 2017

Tune in for live coverage from Glasgow on Monday 3rd April

 

 

Following my previous year experience, I am willing to write a few blog posts about the video content (streamed or recorded interviews or video sessions) published on the IATEFL Online site during the 2017 IATEFL Conference.
Watch the 2017 IATEFL Conference live online
51st Annual International IATEFL Conference and Exhibition
SEC, Glasgow, UK
4th-7th April 2017
Pre-Conference Events and Associates’ Day, 3rd April 2017

 

Learn with top instructors from the best universities in Europe

snapshot12

colangua

CoLanguage

Halina’s English

 

Learning with a real teacher and a structured course helps you to stay motivated and disciplined

ja_obraz

Private 1 on 1 Skype lessons
Your teacher spends all his/her time on you and you do not have to wait on other students.

Your teacher will provide you with as many online learning materials as you want. You will get YouTube videos, audio files, interactive exercises, pdfs and printable documents.

The Essentials About Halina’s Teaching

I am a passionate non- native English teacher from Poland. Teaching is a crucial part of my life. With that understanding, I am a lifelong learner.

 

biblioteka_ja

In the picture, you can see my Polish as a foreign language class. We are studying in the library.

I am applying a blended learning/ training and flipped classroom approaches.
The traditional physical classroom settings are not efficient enough, for my lessons

In my opinion, technology gives us countless new possibilities.
As I have already specified, I prefer blended learning, which means, taking advantage of both, traditional f2f techniques and opportunities confronted with new technologies.
An occasion to meet and connect with people from the entire Globe is one of the reasons I appreciate online communication, very much.
I retired in October 2013 and signed for a freelance Senior Lecturer occupation at the Wroclaw University of Technology.
At present, I am going to continue taking and giving online English courses.

TTO-Halina-Ostankowicz--Bazan-1167767 (2)

What is more, I am confidently getting ready to finalize my online project Halina’s English Academy
http://halina123dotcom.wordpress.com

Thinking in a foreign language is precisely what I want my students to accomplish.
I teach without a bridge language, or lingua franca also known as a common language, trade language or even vehicular language. Students do not share any language.
When I teach Polish, my foreigners and I have to speak only Polish, and my English classes are run entirely in English.
This means they are required to forget about their native language and start speaking as well as thinking in a foreign language.
My students learn English in different contexts, mostly singing phrases, expressions, collocation, idioms, and phrasal verbs, and also telling stories. Moreover, I encourage them to talk to everybody, even to themselves in a foreign language. As a result of this, they can establish a set of compelling stories.

I correct only substantial mistakes. I do not want them to stop talking. I also encourage my students to listen to songs, watch movies with subtitles in a language they learn, read a lot and so forth.
Additionally, I often use YouTube videos to improve a student’s pronunciation, as well as movies with English subtitles and of course songs.

jason-studio

The picture shows my super friend Jason Fluency MC.

I have been taking advantage of Jason’s English classes since I ran into him in 2011.

https://youtu.be/YJm0PRJPNhE?list=PLSY4veVfjc63CFZvyfcU96ZodmJp3h5xV
Music in English Teaching Part 2 Movies
https://youtu.be/gjrhnf8Fshc?list=PLSY4veVfjc63CFZvyfcU96ZodmJp3h5xV

I believe in using music in English teaching. My approach is that we do not speak the language, but rather we sing it. English bears a unique melody, rhythm as well as intonation.
My students enjoy English lessons with me because they are never bored.

Some publications available online
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Halina_Ostankowicz_Bazan/publications https://pwr-wroc.academia.edu/HalinaOstankowiczBazan/Papers

 

 

The long and winding road to success by Tatiana Njegovan

On the 31 October 1991 my ten-year old dream came true – I became an English teacher. I was born in Belgrade, the capital of former Yugoslavia, today Serbia. I successfully passed my State Certific…

Source: The long and winding road to success by Tatiana Njegovan

%d bloggers like this: