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Why The “Grammar First, Speak Later” Approach Doesn’t Work. by Shanthi Streat | Nov 29, 2018

How to teach languages?

Here’s what we did.

➤ I encouraged her to speak freely without correcting her mistakes.

➤ I wanted to hear her story. I wasn’t interested in how she told her story, but what her story was.

➤ I wasn’t interested in her grammar mistakes. I was interested in HER.

➤ I recorded our conversations and shared the recordings with her. I wanted her to hear herself speak and realise how fluid she sounded.

We’re free only when we feel unjudged.
By the end of the week, Chantal’s fear of speaking and making mistakes eased significantly.

She felt reassured that what she had to say was more important than how she said it.

Step #2 – It’s Not About You, It’s About Your Co-Workers.
The next step was to dig deep and reflect on who was her team and what they would need from her.

Would they need a leader who spoke perfect English or a leader who inspired them and helped them work better?

by Shanthi Streat | Nov 29, 2018

 

 

Halina’s VC

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The Six Stages of Second-Language Acquisition

http://www.colorincolorado.org/article/language-acquisition-overviewimg_9807

Pre-production This is also called “the silent period,” when the student takes in the new language but does not speak it. This period often lasts six weeks or longer, depending on the individual.
Early production The individual begins to speak using short words and sentences, but the emphasis is still on listening and absorbing the new language. There will be many errors in the early production stage.
Speech Emergent Speech becomes more frequent, words and sentences are longer, but the individual still relies heavily on context clues and familiar topics. Vocabulary continues to increase and errors begin to decrease, especially in common or repeated interactions.
Beginning Fluency Speech is fairly fluent in social situations with minimal errors. New contexts and academic language are challenging and the individual will struggle to express themselves due to gaps in vocabulary and appropriate phrases.
Intermediate Fluency Communicating in the second language is fluent, especially in social language situations. The individual is able to speak almost fluently in new situations or in academic areas, but there will be gaps in vocabulary knowledge and some unknown expressions. There are very few errors, and the individual is able to demonstrate higher order thinking skills in the second language such as offering an opinion or analyzing a problem.
Advanced Fluency The individual communicates fluently in all contexts and can maneuver successfully in new contexts and when exposed to new academic information. At this stage, the individual may still have an accent and use idiomatic expressions incorrectly at times, but the individual is essentially fluent and comfortable communicating in the second language.

How long does it take for a language learner to go through these stages? Just as in any other learning situation, it depends on the individual. One of the major contributors to accelerated second language learning is the strength of first language skills. Language researchers such as Jim Cummins, Catherine Snow, Lily Wong Filmore and Stephen Krashen have studied this topic in a variety of ways for many years. The general consensus is that it takes between five to seven years for an individual to achieve advanced fluency. This generally applies to individuals who have strong first language and literacy skills. If an individual has not fully developed first language and literacy skills, it may take between seven to ten years to reach advanced fluency. It is very important to note that every ELL student comes with his or her own unique language and education background, and this will have an impact on their English learning process.

It is also important to keep in mind that the understood goal for American ELL students is Advanced Fluency, which includes fluency in academic contexts as well as social contexts. Teachers often get frustrated when ELL students appear to be fluent because they have strong social English skills, but then they do not participate well in academic projects and discussions. Teachers who are aware of ELL students’ need to develop academic language fluency in English will be much better prepared to assist those students in becoming academically successful. (Learn more about academic language in Colorín Colorado’s academic language resource section.)

 

To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before

via To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before

To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before

To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before

By Jenny Han

MAJOR MOTION PICTURE COMING TO NETFLIX AUGUST 17, 2018!

Lara Jean’s love life gets complicated in this New York Times bestselling “lovely, lighthearted romance” (SLJ) from the New York Times bestselling author of The Summer I Turned Pretty series.

What if all the crushes you ever had found out how you felt about them…all at once?

Sixteen-year-old Lara Jean Song keeps her love letters in a hatbox her mother gave her. They aren’t love letters that anyone else wrote for her; these are ones she’s written. One for every boy she’s ever loved—five in all. When she writes, she pours out her heart and soul and says all the things she would never say in real life, because her letters are for her eyes only. Until the day her secret letters are mailed, and suddenly, Lara Jean’s love life goes from imaginary to out of control.

artistic blossom bright clouds

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

How to introduce yourself so you’ll be unforgettable (in a good way!) — ideas.ted.com

If you can move beyond the boring basics when you’re asked “What do you do?”, you’ll set yourself up for new relationships, opportunities and revelations, says introduction expert Joanna Bloor. Mingling at a work event inevitably means being asked the question “What do you do?” over and over again. After years of repetition and conditioning,…

via How to introduce yourself so you’ll be unforgettable (in a good way!) — ideas.ted.com

Grass Roots: The Rise and Fall and Rise of Marijuana in America — Emily Dufton

Let’s say NO TO DRUGS!!!!!!!!!!!

The Story's Story

Grass Roots is about marijuana, yes, but it’s also about what it means to live in society and what it means to be:

The battle over the drug has always been about much more than whether individuals have the right to smoke, eat, or vape it for effect. Instead, questions about marijuana have long been tied to ideas about freedom and liberty, safety and security, and the rights of an individual versus the collective good—themes that are at the core of many other historical debates.

Much of the book is new to me: I didn’t know how much decriminalization happened in the ’70s, when 11 states decriminalized weed. I didn’t realize how much anti-drug hysteria occurred in the ’80s. I didn’t know the specific mechanisms that drove drug policy back and forth. Now I do, but I’ll warn that the book is often more detailed than most readers want…

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The Essentials Of Halina’s Teaching

_Professional_VC
Halina in VC
I am a passionate non- native English teacher from Poland. Teaching is a crucial part of my life. With that understanding, I am a lifelong learner.

I am applying a blended learning/ training and flipped classroom approaches.
The traditional physical classroom settings are not efficient enough, for my lessons.

In my opinion, technology gives us countless new possibilities.
As I have already specified, I prefer blended learning, which means, taking advantage of both, traditional f2f techniques and opportunities confronted with new technologies.

An occasion to meet and connect with people from the entire Globe is one of the reasons I appreciate online communication, very much.

I retired in October 2013 and signed for a freelance Senior Lecturer occupation at the Wroclaw University of Technology.

At present, I am going to continue taking and giving online English courses.

Thinking in a foreign language is precisely what I want my students to accomplish. I teach without a bridge language, or lingua franca was also known as a common language, trade language or even vehicular language. Students do not share any language. I focus on practical communication skills which cover the ability to: speak appropriately with a wide variety of students while maintaining good eye contact, demonstrate a varied vocabulary and tailor the language to your audience. We need to listen effectively, present ideas appropriately, write clearly and in brief and work well in a group. All of these abilities and competencies required excellent communication skills.

When I teach Polish, my foreigners and I have to speak only Polish, and my English classes are run entirely in English.
This means they are required to forget about their native language and start speaking as well as thinking in a foreign language.
My students learn English in different contexts, mostly singing phrases, expressions, collocation, idioms, and phrasal verbs, and also telling stories. Moreover, I encourage them to talk to everybody, even to themselves in a foreign language. As a result of this, they can establish a set of compelling stories. I correct only substantial mistakes. I do not want them to stop talking. I also encourage my students to listen to songs, watch movies with subtitles in a language they learn, read a lot and so forth.
Additionally, to improve a student’s pronunciation, I often use YouTube videos as well as movies with English subtitles and obviously songs.

I believe in using music in English teaching. My approach is that we do not speak the language, but instead we sing it. English bears a unique melody, rhythm as well as intonation.
My students enjoy English lessons with me because they are never bored.

Halina_June_2018_Moment

 

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