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Muhammet Kahraman – Today I Will Not Die

Picpicture-12Turgay Evren’s ESL

Today I will not die is a song of hope written for Syrian refugee kids and all children of war in the world.

Lyrics: Turgay Evren
Melody: Muhammet Kahraman
Arrangement: Emre Moğulkoç

Songs are being used in the USA schools

Today I will not die is a song of hope written for Syrian refugee kids and all children of war in the world.

Today I will not die
Today my land is Turkey

Dreams were my home
The jets hijacked
Green was my land
Before the sunset, I will not give up
I will leave behind
Blood and death
My orphan heart is my best friend
My smile sets my path

We are the children of heaven
Our love will beat all the weapons
We are the roses of all seasons
Compassion will conquer all the vengeance
We are all brothers and sisters
We deserve the world much better

Today I will not complain
Today I will be content
Today I got no space for pain
Hope will spread to every tent

My toys are bombs
Raining from the skies
Human rights are a song
Composed of white lies
My soul will not starve
Hope will not drown
In the sea of blame
My heart will not go lame
My innocence will rise again

Dreams were my home
The jets hijacked

Green was my land
Before the sunset
I will not give up
I will leave behind
Blood and death
My orphan heart is my best friend
My smile sets my path

We are the children of the heaven
Our love will beat all the weapons
We are the roses of all seasons
Compassion will conquer all the vengeance
We are all brothers and sisters
We deserve the world much better

 

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Business Small Talk: How to Have Good Conversations (Even When You Don’t Feel Confident Speaking English) | English with a Twist

For my students.

Continuing with the theme of guest posts, I am delighted to introduce you to yet another guest writer here on EWAT. This time I have the pleasure of welcoming Jacob Gershkovich, a fellow English teacher. In his interesting and super useful post, Jacob brilliantly illustrates how you can make a good impression and enjoy a good conversation with business colleagues even if you feel your English could be better. This is ideal for anyone who wants to feel more confident in the business small talk. Enjoy the post. *************************** Listen to the post Read the post Let’s imagine that you’re at a networking event. You see someone standing across the room who you’d really like to connect with, someone who could be really helpful to know. You want to introduce yourself to this person and begin a conversation, but you don’t feel confident as an English speaker. You’re worried that you won’t be able to express yourself properly in English, or even worse, that you’ll say something silly

Source: Business Small Talk: How to Have Good Conversations (Even When You Don’t Feel Confident Speaking English) | English with a Twist

IATEFL 2016 I’m a non-native English speaker teacher – hear me roar! (Dita Phillips)

Thank you for this post.
As a non- native English teacher, I am going to join this meaningful discussion.

By Marek Kiczkowiak

There are perceptions that native speakers of English make better English language teachers. Marek Kiczkowiak Opens in a new tab or window., winner of the British Council’s Teaching English blog award, argues that those perceptions need to change.Have you looked for an English teaching job recently? If you’re a Native English Speaker Teacher (NEST) then you’ll have seen an abundance of teaching opportunities out there. But for a non-native English Speaker Teacher (NNEST), it’s a different story.

Up to 70 per cent of all jobs advertised on tefl.com – the biggest job search engine for English teachers – are for NESTs (yes, I have counted). And in some countries such as Korea it’s even worse – almost all recruiters will reject any application Opens in a new tab or window. that doesn’t say English native speaker on it.

If you start questioning these practices, you are likely to hear one or all of the following excuses:

1. Students prefer NESTs
2. Students need NESTs to learn ‘good’ English
3. Students need NESTs to understand ‘the culture’
4. NESTs are better for public relations

While it is beyond the scope of this short article to fully debunk all the above, I would like to briefly outline here why these arguments are flawed.

1: The first argument gets repeated like a mantra and has become so deeply ingrained that few attempt to question its validity. Yet, I have never seen a single study that would give it even the slightest backing. On the other hand, I have seen many which confirm that students value traits Opens in a new tab or window. which have nothing to do with ‘nativeness’, such as being respectful, a good communicator, helpful, well prepared, organised, clear-voiced, and hard working. Other studies Opens in a new tab or window. show that students do not have a clear preference for either group. It seems then that it is the recruiters, not the students, who want native speakers.

2: On the second point, I believe it’s a myth Opens in a new tab or window. that only NESTs can provide a good language model. What I find troubling is that many in the profession assume language proficiency to be tantamount to being a good teacher, trivialising many other important factors such as experience, qualifications and personality. While proficiency might be a necessity – and schools should ensure that both the prospective native and non–native teachers can provide a clear and intelligible language model – proficiency by itself should not be treated as the deciding factor that makes or breaks a teacher. Successful teaching is so much more! As David Crystal put it in an interview for TEFL Equity Advocates Opens in a new tab or window.: ‘All sorts of people are fluent, but only a tiny proportion of them are sufficiently aware of the structure of the language that they know how to teach it.’ So if recruiters care about students’ progress, I suggest taking an objective and balanced view when hiring teachers, and rejecting the notion that nativeness is equal to teaching ability.

3: As for the third argument, most people will agree that language and culture are inextricably connected. But does a ‘native English speaker culture’ exist? I dare say it doesn’t. After all, English is an official language in more than 60 sovereign states. English is not owned by the English or the Americans, even if it’s convenient to think so. But as Hugh Dellar notes Opens in a new tab or window., even if we look at one country in particular, ‘there is very clearly no such thing as “British culture” in any monolithic sense’. As native speakers, we should have the humility to acknowledge that ‘no native speakers have experience, or understand all aspects of the culture to which they belong’ (David Crystal Opens in a new tab or window.).

4: Finally, the almighty and ‘untouchable’ market demand. Show me the evidence, I say. Until then, I maintain that a much better marketing strategy is to hire the best teachers, chosen carefully based on qualifications, experience and demonstrable language proficiency, rather than on their mother tongue. We are not slaves of the market. We can influence and shape it. As Henry Ford once said: ‘If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have told me: faster horses’.

Perhaps most significant of all, being a NNEST might actually give you certain advantages as a teacher. For example, you can better anticipate students’ problems, serve as a successful learning model or understand how the learners feel. Actually, in a recent post James Taylor went as far as wishing he were a non–native speaker Opens in a new tab or window..

However, I feel that the question Peter Medgyes asks is his article Opens in a new tab or window.: ‘Native or non–native: who’s worth more?’ misses the point slightly. As Michael Griffin has shown Opens in a new tab or window., the answer is neither. Both groups can make equally good or bad teachers. It’s all down to the factors I’ve been talking about here: personal traits, qualifications, experience and demonstrable language proficiency. Your mother tongue, place of birth, sexual orientation, height, gender or skin colour are all equally irrelevant.

So why does this obsession with ‘nativeness’ refuse to go away? Because for years the English language teaching (ELT) industry told students that only NESTs could teach them ‘good’ English, that NESTs were the panacea for all their language ills. But let’s be blunt and have the courage to acknowledge that the industry encouraged a falsehood which many of us chose to turn a blind eye to while others assumed they could do nothing. I feel this needs to change.

The good news is that positive changes are already taking place. TESOL France has issued a public letter condemning the discrimination of NNESTs. Some of the most renowned ELT professionals such as Jeremy Harmer and Scott Thornbury, as well as organisations such as the British Council Teaching English team have already expressed their strong support for the TEFL Equity Advocates Opens in a new tab or window. campaign I started, which fights for equal professional opportunities for native and non–native teachers.

And you can help bring about the change too in numerous ways that were outlined here. So stand up, speak out and join the movement.

IATEFL 2016 I’m a non-native English speaker teacher – hear me roar! (Dita Phillips)

Lizzie Pinard

Dita starts by telling us what her talk is NOT about – statistics, definitions, discrimination etc.

Then she tells us about Martina who was incredulous that it was possible to be Czech and teach English in Oxford.

Dita started learning English when she was 6 years old. She did her CELTA in Czech Republic, with British and Polish tutors. It was great for the NNS to have Polish tutors but it was never discussed, which was a real missed opportunity. Would have been good to talk about teachers as role models. She was one of the first NNS teachers in the first school that hired her, as it was new for them to recruit NNS. When she got to Oxford, applying for jobs, a number of schools told her yes your qualifications and experiences are good but we don’t hire NNS but finally she did get a job at a…

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Plenary by Diane Larsen-Freeman

 

Please, click on the link to watch the video.

//www.viddler.com/embed/625bd95b/?f=1&offset=0&autoplay=0&player=full&secret=46342320&disablebranding=0&view_secret=46342320


IATEFL Online Birmingham 2016 Registered Blogger

Presenter(s):
Diane Larsen-Freeman
Session details:

Shifting metaphors from computer input to ecological affordances

Fifty years ago, around the same time that IATEFL was founded, inquiries into the nature of additional language learning were begun. One of the earliest avenues of inquiry concerned the nature of the linguistic input that language learners were exposed to. Not only was the input thought to be the raw material that the learners had to work with, linguistic input was also thought to be a driving force in second language development. Researchers sought to demonstrate the effect of the input on what was called learners’ output.
While this line of research been fruitful in contributing to our understanding of language learning, it has been encumbered by the use of its computer-related metaphors of input and output. Clearly, our students are not computers. We know that the way we talk influences and reflects the way we think. One problem with “input” is that it ascribes passivity to learners, robbing them of their agency. Another problem is that it suggests that there is a conduit between input and output. It overlooks the meaning-making nature of language use. A third problem is that the use of “input” necessitates all sorts of terminological profusion, such as “intake” and “uptake.” At this point, there is a need to move beyond input-output metaphors to embrace a new way of understanding, one informed by Complexity Theory with its ecological orientation – one of affordances.
Affordances are two-way relationships between the learner and the environment. Affordances afford opportunities for action on the part of learners, provided that the affordances are perceived by learners. In this way, learners create their own affordances. Thus, affordances restore agency to learners. This also partially explains why learners’ developmental patterns are different. In this presentation, I will elaborate on affordances and discuss the implications of affordances for English language learning and teaching.
– See more at:

http://iatefl.britishcouncil.org/2016/session/plenary-diane-larsen-freeman#sthash.6QROcfKn.dpuf

Video: Engaging ELs in Content Discussions in the Classroom

Check out the video at

Source: Video: Engaging ELs in Content Discussions in the Classroom

Wideo, WeVideo, and Magisto – Three Good Tools for Creating Videos Online

Wideo, WeVideo, and Magisto – Three Good Tools for Creating Videos Online.

Wideo is a neat video creation service that allows anyone to create animated videos and Common Craft-style videos online through a simple drag-and-drop process. A couple of months ago Wideo started offering templates to help users start their video projects. Wideo templates provide a basic framework for a video’s theme. A couple of the templates that might be of interest to teachers are the slideshow template and the curriculum template.

Featured Video: Why Teachers Matter

Featured Video: Why Teachers Matter.

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